Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Conference for Advancing Evidence-Based Learning

Session Details

During morning sessions, afternoon workshops, and the poster reception, you will hear from Northeastern faculty, staff/co-curricular educators, and students discussing their work in the following areas:

Research on Teaching and Learning

Presentations of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) that systematically investigate teaching and learning in course environments.

Cross-Role Collaborations

Teams that include educators from multiple roles–including faculty, staff/co-curricular educators and/or students–share the approach, goals, and outcomes of collaborative projects.

New Designs for Learning

Examples of forward-thinking teaching methods, including those that embody the Northeastern 2025 vision.

Concurrent Sessions (9:30-10:00 AM)

Lorna Hayward, EdD, MPH, PT
Associate Professor
Department of Physical Therapy, Movement & Rehabilitation Science
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Pam Donlan, PT, DPT, EdD, CLT-LANA
Assistant Clinical Professor
Department of Physical Therapy, Movement & Rehabilitation Science
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Abstract

Faculty engage in “pedagogical solitude,” in which they plan, teach, and assess their work alone. To optimize learning outcomes, student pedagogical teams (SPTs) can provide feedback on instructor performance, course structure, and content. Using self-determination theory, this study explored experiences of students serving on SPTs, faculty perceptions, and impact on class motivation. Two of four sections of Psychosocial Aspects incorporated SPTs. SPTs administered five two-minute papers to obtain feedback to share with the instructor. All sections completed the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) pre-/post-semester. SPTs completed midterm and final reflections, and faculty reflected after each SPT-faculty meeting. Results confirmed serving on SPTs gave students a voice and increased motivation and appreciation for the complexity of teaching. Faculty gained a wider perspective on classroom practice. Using SPTs, faculty can establish classroom environments that facilitate students’ internal motivation, active learning, and intellectual development.

Katy Shorey, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Philosophy and Religion
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Abstract

The literature supporting active and collaborative learning convinced me to flip my philosophy courses. It also motivated new research questions: How do traditional measurements of student proficiency and growth compare to student assessments of learning? How do students evaluate which activities are worth their time and energy? And, how do students explain the value? What I discovered is that students prize metacognition. According to the data I collected, the most powerful active learning events are paired with debrief activities. In fact, student reports focused primarily on debrief activities, rather than initial assignments. The lesson for me: debrief is the main event, not a wrap-up. The implication for my flipped classroom: I’ve re-designed each of my classroom activities to include debrief, drawing from metacognition literature. In this session, I’ll share the data I collected, my re-designed activities, and my plan for testing the effectiveness of this project in Fall 2019.

Anne L. van de Ven, PhD
Research Assistant Professor
Physics
College of Science

Srinivas Sridhar, PhD
University Distinguished Professor & Director, EMRI
Physics
College of Science

Karen Burns White, MA
Deputy Associate Director
Initiative to Eliminate Cancer Disparities
Dana-Farber / Harvard Cancer Center

Abstract

Undergraduate research is recognized as a high-impact practice that promotes persistence in college, pursuit of graduate programs, and commitment to STEM careers. With support of the National Cancer Institute, Northeastern University and Dana-Farber Harvard Cancer Center jointly established an undergraduate research training program in cancer nanomedicine. The Cancer Nanomedicine Co-ops for Undergraduate Research Experiences (CaNCURE) was founded on the hypothesis that a mentored research experience, accompanied by a rich educational environment providing intellectual immersion in cancer nanomedicine, would motivate young scientists and engineers to consider a career in this field. Since 2014, CaNCURE has successfully placed 75 undergraduates in cancer nanomedicine laboratories across the Boston area. This program has drawn trainees from 12 different fields of study, over half of whom have continued to work in their CaNCURE laboratory after co-op completion. This talk will focus on the challenges unique to creating an interdisciplinary training program and present evidence of successful solutions.

Laurie Nardone, PhD
Associate Teaching Professor
English
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Abstract

Students in Northeastern’s General Studies Program take a year-long sequence of First-Year Writing in which most students remain with the same teacher. I incorrectly hypothesized that students returning to my class for a second semester would be more confident, and therefore, more successful with challenging assignments than students joining the class in the second term. By calling on Reiff and Bawarshi’s (2011) notions of “boundary crossers” (those who revise prior assumptions when they are no longer relevant) and “boundary guarders” (those who cling to existing assumptions even in the face of contrary evidence), I theorize that boundary crossing students experience successes more than boundary guarders, regardless of teacher. Moving forward, this second-term class might experience more writing successes by specifically calling attention to boundaries–both crossing and guarding them–and offer both instructors and students a language for reactions to those setbacks or critical moments writers face in their processes.

Brianne McDonough, MEd
Assistant Co-op Coordinator
Cooperative Education
Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Brian Sweeney
Co-op Counselor
Cooperative Education
Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Merideth Stroh, MA
Academic Services Coordinator
Office of Global Services

Anne Grieves, MA
Associate Director
Employer Engagement and Career Design
Career Services

Megan Giordano, MSEd
Assistant Director of Student Services
Student Support Services
Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Abstract

“Oh! That sounds similar to the work they are doing in…” Oftentimes, new student-focused initiatives are undertaken with enthusiasm and good intentions but may miss the important step of identifying other key partners on campus that can either add value and diverse perspectives or who may already be working towards a similar goal. Our session will highlight how Khoury College co-op and advising collaborated with the Office of Global Services and Employer Engagement and Career Design to pilot a “Sequencing Success” series for international students. The series is designed to address challenges international students experience as they seek experiential learning opportunities through co-op, after data indicated they were behind domestic peers in communication skills, building peer and professional networks, and knowledge of careers within the field. This session will showcase our process of identifying a challenge through formal and informal data collection, identifying key campus partners to collaborate with and, ultimately, how we brought our expertise together to create our workshop series.

Concurrent Sessions (10:10-10:40 AM)

Hilary Schuldt, PhD
Director of Project and Team Strategy
Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning Through Research

Abstract

A successful learning environment is a collaborative effort between educators and learners, and open communication and feedback are key to this success. In this workshop, we will explore how meeting regularly with a small group of learners (often called a “student feedback team”) to discuss and improve the learning environment can be a valuable experience for learners and educators alike. We will discuss different structures for this evidence-based practice, and participants will begin envisioning how they and their learners might benefit.

* Please note: the interactive session titled “Motivating Your Learners (and Yourself) Through a Feedback Team” runs for the duration of two time slots (from 10:10 AM-11:20 AM).

Melissa Parenti, EdD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Graduate School of Education
College of Professional Studies

Joan Giblin, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Graduate School of Education
College of Professional Studies

Abstract

This session is designed to address the challenges of faculty development and implementing university-wide initiatives in predominantly online programming. More specifically, the session presents a model for enacting the SAIL initiative through intentional faculty development. A framework for faculty development in online settings will be presented. Implementation of this model and lessons learned will be shared. Participants will gather both an understanding of inquiry-based faculty development and experiences of faculty, staff, and students engaging with the SAIL initiative.

Patricia Ann Mabrouk, PhD
Professor
Chemistry and Chemical Biology
College of Science

Lauren Abbott, COS’18
Alumni
Chemistry
College of Science

Abstract

If you are like many STEM faculty, it may surprise you to learn that your graduate students and your undergraduate research students do not know how authorship decision-making is negotiated in your laboratory, and they are not going to ask you about authorship–no matter how approachable you are. In this session, we will share findings from our four-year qualitative study of 42 STEM faculty, graduate student mentors, and their undergraduate research protégés. Attendees will leave with practical recommendations and tools that the busiest faculty research mentor can use to embed authorship training into undergraduate research experiences.

Eric Winter, MS
Assistant Co-op Coordinator
Cooperative Education
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Richard Conley, JD
Associate Co-op Coordinator
Cooperative Education
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Erika Knox
Undergraduate Student
History
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Gabe Morris
Undergraduate Student
Politics, Philosophy, and Economics
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Kolby O’Brien
Undergraduate Student
History
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Abstract

We wanted our course to be more engaging. We also wanted to use TAs in a more robust way. So, we empowered our teaching assistants to co-design and co-teach our course. We’ll share our methods and results after intentionally utilizing TAs to develop and implement lessons, assignments, and rubrics. We’ll show how the effort is worth the outcome and that once you begin utilizing students as partners, you’ll be hungry to search for more ways to develop these partnerships.

Stephanie Frazitta, MEd
Assistant Director, Academic Advising
International Programs
College of Professional Studies

Lucy Bunning, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
International Programs
College of Professional Studies

Abstract

This session will provide an example of successful collaboration between faculty and advising through the integration of academic advising initiatives into a first-year-experience course. Our goal was to align both the advising and course learning outcomes in order to assist students in making connections between learning experiences (curricular and co-curricular) and build their networks on campus. Through this collaboration, students’ well-being and connection to the university were at the forefront, which resulted in a mutually beneficial experience for students, faculty and advising alike. The audience will see an example of the SAIL mindset in action.

Concurrent Sessions (10:50-11:20 AM)

Patty Goodman, EdD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Master of Science in Corporate and Organizational Communication (MSCOC)
College of Professional Studies

Ed Powers, PhD
Professor of the Practice
Master of Science in Corporate and Organizational Communication (MSCOC)
College of Professional Studies

Carl Zangerl, PhD
Associate Teaching Professor
Master of Science in Corporate and Organizational Communication (MSCOC)
College of Professional Studies

Donna DiGiovanni, MEd
Instructional Designer
Lifelong Learning Network

Zirui Yan, MS
Student Support Coordinator
Master of Science in Corporate and Organizational Communication (MSCOC)
College of Professional Studies

Abstract

The College of Professional Studies Graduate Corporate and Organizational Communication program identified a need to intentionally build reflective learning into the final, experiential capstone project. We decided to take a collaborative and participative approach–incorporating voices from instructional design, faculty, students, and alumni–to design an eportfolio template to help students improve critical reflection, articulate competencies, and develop personal branding. This presentation will explore the triangulation of the eportfolio implementation process, integrating students as partners, and recognizing high-impact learning opportunities. Sample eportfolios will illustrate how using an eportfolio helped make students’ SAIL dimensional development visible. We will share our challenges and successes, as well as offer suggestions to consider when implementing a systematic change.

Wolfgang Gatterbauer, PhD
Associate Professor
Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Abstract

Research on “active retrieval practice” and “learning by explaining” suggest that these two practices enhance student learning, and peer-based computer-supported learning systems are well-placed to facilitate such practices by combining them. Inspired by these lines of research, we developed a learning management system that engages students throughout the semester in a structured and repeated sequence of creating, answering, improving, and selecting improvements to a series of multiple-choice questions. Each activity in a cycle produces “learning artifacts” used in subsequent steps, supports students’ learning, and enables continuous assessment of each student’s mastery of the subject. A comparison between student mastery scores from the learning management system and end-of-semester grades demonstrates the potential as an assessment tool. During the presentation, I will also share functionalities such as computational assessments that evaluate the quality of student-created questions and highlight ways in which the system may be used in classes.

Anne L. van de Ven, PhD
Research Assistant Professor
Physics
College of Science

Srinivas Sridhar, PhD
University Distinguished Professor & Director EMRI
Physics
College of Science

Abstract

The Nanomedicine Academy of Minority Serving Institutions is a collaborative model of higher education that provides state-of-the-art knowledge to underserved minority populations. Northeastern University, together with Morgan State University, Tuskegee University, Florida International University, and University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez has created a “national nanomedicine classroom” where students receive course credit for remotely attending courses and participating in collaborative cross-institutional course activities. A total of five nanomedicine courses have been developed to date, offering students the opportunity to: 1) learn, practice, and reflect on enabling innovations in nanomedicine; 2) teach peers about exciting new research; 3) conduct research experiments using remotely operated instruments; 4) create a virtual startup company under the mentorship of biotech industry experts; and 5) hear first-hand accounts of nanomedicine research and innovations from guest experts. Today, these blended courses are simultaneously attended by ~90 students per semester from 18 STEM disciplines.

Stephen Holsenbeck
Graduate Student
Health Data Analytics
Bouvé College of Health Sciences & Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Mariya Shiyko, PhD
Associate Professor
Applied Psychology
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Babatunde Aideyan, MA
PhD Candidate
Applied Psychology
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Abstract

The experience of the academic environment can be competitive, stressful, and at times overwhelming for students and faculty alike. Self-compassion (defined by Neff et al., 2017, as including self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness) has been associated with general resourcefulness (Martin et al., 2019), self-regulation (Dundas et al., 2017), and well-being (Gunnell et al., 2017) in university students, but mindfulness practices evoking self-compassion remain underutilized in academic contexts. This presentation will share a meta-analysis synthesizing existing evidence for self-compassion outcomes of mindfulness interventions conducted in educational contexts, and the design features of these interventions that elicit optimal outcomes. We hope that the presentation inspires ideas for integrating and designing mindfulness interventions into course curriculum to improve student outcomes, and the experience of the course for faculty and students alike.

Concurrent Workshops (2:00-3:15 PM)

Dr. Alison Cook-Sather, PhD
Mary Katharine Woodworth Professor of Education
Director, Peace, Conflict and Social Justice concentration
Director, Teaching and Learning Institute, Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges

Abstract

Join keynote speaker Alison Cook-Sather in a less formal setting to continue the conversation about working in meaningful partnership with students.

Rebecca Riccio, MA
Director of Social Impact Lab and Program Director
Human Services
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Carolin Fuchs, PhD
Teaching Professor
World Languages Center
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Brianne McDonough, MEd
Assistant Co-op Coordinator
Cooperative Education
Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Sarah Kostanski, MA
Former Assistant Co-op Coordinator
Cooperative Education
College of Engineering

Tracy Carter, PhD
Gordon Mentor & Part-Time Lecturer
Chemical Engineering
College of Engineering

Abstract

Northeastern’s Self-Authored Integrated Learning (SAIL) platform provides a framework for articulating and amplifying critical competencies, literacies, and attributes embedded within learning opportunities students experience in diverse contexts across campus. Intended for educators who have had minimal exposure to SAIL or are uncertain about how it can benefit their teaching, this workshop will provide models and strategies for using the platform to enhance students’ learning wherever it happens. Participants should bring a syllabus, learning objectives, assignment, or other teaching instrument to work on. Activities will be structured to allow cross-role and interdisciplinary collaboration and demonstrate the benefits of having a shared language of teaching and learning across campus.

Alessandra Di Credico, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Physics
College of Science

Mary Lynn Fahey, DNP
Clinical Instructor
Nursing
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Kelly Garneau, PhD
Associate Teaching Professor
English
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

David Hagen, JD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Criminal Justice,
Intelligence, and
Homeland Security
College of Professional Studies

Andrew Mackie, MPAS, PA-C
Assistant Clinical Professor
Physician Assistant Program
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Desislava Raytcheva, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Biology
College of Science

Katy Shorey, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Philosophy and Religion
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Mark Sivak, PhD
Associate Teaching Professor
Art + Design and Engineering
College of Arts, Media & Design and College of Engineering

Michelle Laboy, MUP, M.Arch.
Assistant Professor
Architecture
College of Arts, Media & Design

Laurie Nardone, PhD
Associate Teaching Professor
English
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Abstract

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) creates a space for educators to share and systematically investigate bottlenecks in student learning. SoTL is a form of research, a scholarly practice, and a community that is engaged in and invigorated by the investigation of thorny problems. CATLR sponsors an 18-month SoTL program, which participants often come into after participating in a CATLR Fellows program. In this workshop you will have an opportunity to hear from the ten 2018-19 Faculty Scholars, discuss their current work and experience in the program, and identify teaching challenges and puzzlements central to your own discipline that you might want to investigate.

Andrea Raynor, MFA
Full Teaching Professor & Associate Dean
Art + Design
College of Arts, Media & Design

Laura Green, PhD
Associate Dean of Teaching, Learning, and Experiential Education
Professor of English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Chris Gallagher, PhD
Vice Provost of Curriculum Advancement
Undergraduate Affairs
Office of the Provost

Costas Panagopoulos, PhD
Professor
Political Science
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Abstract

This interactive workshop is designed for educators and administrators interested in “pop-up” courses: short-term, responsive, immersive one- or two-credit courses. After a brief initial framing of the role that pop-ups are playing in higher education and at Northeastern, the session will engage participants in the following activities: (1) exploring the pedagogical and curricular rationales for these courses; (2) identifying appropriate topics and occasions for such courses; (3) brainstorming challenges or problems associated with such courses and strategies for avoiding or mitigating them; (4) mapping out initial pop-up course designs. Participants will leave this session with a clearer understanding of the potential and perils of pop-ups, an ability to distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate pop-up ideas, and, if they desire, a start on a pop-up of their own.

Kara Curcio, MA
Associate Director
Residential Life
Student Affairs

Michael Hoppmann, PhD
Associate Teaching Professor
Communication Studies
College of Arts, Media & Design

Marilyn Minus, PhD
Associate Professor
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
College of Engineering

Shan Mohammed, MD
Associate Clinical Profesor & Interim Chair
Health Sciences
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Thomas Vicino, PhD
Professor & Chair
Political Science
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Abstract

This hands-on, interactive workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to learn best practices in designing and implementing co-curricular learning activities based on theoretical frameworks in student development and practical experience within the Faculty-in-Residence Program (FiR). The FiR was created in order to address a limited perception of learning as a binary experience divided between the classroom and residential setting. FiR provides an outlet to connect faculty with students in ways which enhance faculty members’ understanding of the present-day student experience. Faculty-in-Residence design and implement educational, social and cultural programming for students, while also serving as a mentor, teacher, and leader in the residential community. The current Faculty-in-Residence will lead this workshop, in which participants will be prompted to brainstorm a program that moves beyond the walls of the classroom to support integrated student learning.

Poster Reception (3:15-4:30 PM)

Katie Delude, MS, LAT, ATC
Head Athletic Trainer
Athletic Training
Student Affairs

Katie Brooks, MA, CPT
Student-Athlete Development
Athletic Training
Student Affairs

Mike McKenney, MS, LAT, ATC
Associate Director for Medical Compliance
Sports Performance
Student Affairs

Abstract

This poster will present a system created by a multi-disciplinary group within Sports Performance and Student Affairs that supports the holistic growth and development of student-athletes. Placing the student at the center of our model, we have developed an ecosystem of resources to improve students’ well-being skills, professional and personal effectiveness, and intellectual agility. Our collaborative team of educators offers guidance and structure, which allows students to express agency and self-direct their learning. Students assess and monitor their progress to discover personalized solutions and adjust their strategies when needed. This self-actualized strategy has led to positive behavior change in our student-athletes. Using our model, students learn to self-monitor and to intrinsically drive personalized interventions for growth, autonomy, accountability, and healthy living. We intend to expand our system beyond Division I student-athletes to a larger population of active individuals in the Northeastern community.

Mamta Saxena, PhD
Director of Assessment
College of Professional Studies

Alice Mello, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Graduate Programs
College of Professional Studies

Uwe Hohgrawe, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Graduate Programs
College of Professional Studies

Melanie Kasparian, MBA
Associate Director of Assessment
College of Professional Studies

Abstract

Access to context-based and targeted feedback on assignments can empower and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning, while access to evidence-based data on student performance and learning can empower faculty to make changes to instructional and assessment design. This kind of data can help faculty make informed decisions about their teaching and student learning in real-time. This poster will highlight the critical role of both professional and SAIL competencies in defining learning outcomes, the curriculum, and assessments. We will showcase how faculty can collect meaningful and powerful evidence of learning and performance at the competencies and skills level in an automated fashion when rubrics are used to grade assessments within Blackboard.

Manon Battistella
Undergraduate Student
College of Science

Patricia Ann Mabrouk, PhD
Professor
Chemistry and Chemical Biology
College of Science

Abstract

Data analysis tools evolve simultaneously with analytical instrumentation and computational techniques. Today, multivariate analysis methods are increasingly used for data analysis, which is readily performed using computational software like Matlab. Currently, MatLab, or any computer programming tool, is not usually introduced to chemistry students, though it is widely used by physics and engineering students. For this purpose, we have been developing two modules that introduce undergraduate chemistry majors to Matlab. First, students analyze an over-the-counter analgesic for caffeine using HPLC and then analyze their external calibration curve data using linear regression performed in the Matlab environment. Second, students collect high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and UV-Vis spectroscopy data for red and white wines and use principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the phenolic content of an unknown wine to determine its origin. Preliminary assessment data will be presented for the analgesic module from Fall 2018.

Lucas Landherr, PhD
Associate Teaching Professor
Chemical Engineering
College of Engineering

Abstract

The potential of comics as teaching tools has been known for decades, but only recently been utilized in earnest throughout all fields of education. The dramatic expansion in comics through independent artists and book series has illustrated the opportunity for this integration of art into education, particularly in STEM. Comics have a unique demonstrated potential for improving student enthusiasm, confidence, and understanding in complex concepts, and their use directly addresses major obstacles to effective learning for any abstract core concept with no obvious visual representation. This presentation will discuss the impact of comics used in Northeastern classrooms, and guide educators in developing comics of their own as teaching tools.

Sarah Klionsky, MS
Associate Co-op Coordinator
Cooperative Education
College of Science

Michelle Zaff, JD
Associate Co-op Coordinator
Cooperative Education
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Sarah Lam
Undergraduate Student
Environmental Studies
College of Science

Rebecca Raffo
Undergraduate Student
Political Science/ International Affairs
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Gail Matthews-DeNatale, PhD
Associate Director
Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning Through Research

Abstract

This poster describes our experience using the “Students as Partners” model to conduct research into reflective practice within cooperative education at Northeastern. Because the goal of our research is to understand the student experience of reflecting on their work and learning on co-op, we wanted to include students from the early stages of the research process, including devising the question and research methods, as well as collecting and analyzing data. Students as Partners is a model that can be used across disciplines by faculty and staff who are looking to involve students in research and projects in a more generative capacity. We identify many benefits of having students and faculty work together on a project from its inception, but we have also experienced significant challenges. While students and faculty have been contributing substantively on a similar level, it is still unclear whether the students feel comfortable taking leadership roles within the group. The logistical challenges of managing a group with no clear leader and many busy schedules have also slowed the progress of this ongoing project.

Carla Bouwmeester, RPh, MS, PharmD, BCPS, BCGP, FASCP
Associate Clinical Professor
Pharmacy and Health Systems Sciences
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Patty Goodman, EdD
Assistant Teaching Professor
Master of Science in Corporate and Organizational Communication (MSCOC)
College of Professional Studies

Becca Berkey, PhD
Director
Service-Learning
Center of Community Service

Abstract

The purpose of this poster is to address the most common concerns and challenges related to application of the SAIL framework in curriculum design, supporting educators’ shared language, and enhancing learning environments. Anecdotal feedback and personal experiences were collected by the SAIL Outreach to Academic Faculty committee members as well as SAIL ambassadors from across the university to better understand the experiences of faculty and how SAIL aligns with their role. Whereas some faculty have wholeheartedly embraced the SAIL framework, others have been asked to SAIL map their courses without a full understanding of SAIL and the opportunities it presents to enhance evidence-based learning in the classroom. Therefore, the goal of our project is to answer the question “I SAILed my course. Now what?” by: 1) providing background information for faculty to understand the SAIL framework; 2) highlighting evidence-based applications of the SAIL framework in didactic and experiential coursework; and 3) demonstrating how course mapping can provide a shared language to enhance learning environments.

Florencia Gabriele, PhD
Lecturer
College of Professional Studies

Stephen Lyons, MEd, MM, ABD
Lecturer
College of Professional Studies

Abstract

This poster shares our work with Open Educational Resources (OERs) in different classroom settings. We will provide basic information about OERs, such as the types of OER, their uses, and the benefits of using them. We will also offer basic criteria to evaluate OERs for use in different classroom settings. In addition, we will share results of our study of the impact of using OERs in multiple settings. We will provide handouts with OER resources for our colleagues.

Joshua Hertz, PhD
Associate Teaching Professor
First Year Engineering Program
College of Engineering

Noah Daviero
Undergraduate Student
Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering

Abstract

Instruction in intellectual property is common in engineering design curricula, because engineers typically protect their creative design work with patents, trade secrets, and other forms of intellectual property. We present here a study on a new “class patent” experiential learning activity designed to increase students’ interest, understanding, and post-class knowledge retention in the area of intellectual property. The class patent system supplements a competitive design project by allowing students to exclusively own new project ideas. We describe the conception, implementation, and analysis of this semester-long activity. Using a post-class survey, a positive correlation was found between a student’s level of participation in the class patent system and their post-class knowledge of intellectual property. While there is additional instructor effort required to supplement a design project with this class patent system, the data also suggests that it leads students to seek new project ideas more quickly without increasing student stress.

Questions?

If you have any questions email learningresearch@northeastern.edu.